Midwest Regional Native Plants: Local Produce
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Midwest Regional Native Plants: Local Produce

Learning more about your local produce, farmers, and food starts with looking outside. Your surroundings can inform you of which insects will come to your plants each season and if birds come nest in your backyard during the year.  


If you’re a beginner or avid gardener, outdoor enthusiast, or simply interested in educating yourself on your environment, there’s a lot to learn about native plants in your region. In the Midwest, the leaves are changing into vibrant reds, oranges, and yellows. These bushes and trees are very special to bring into your backyard or garden.



Let’s take a look at a few of our Midwestern native plants you’ll notice this season:


Juneberry (Amelanchier)

With red and orange leaves, it’s hard to miss this Juneberry bush. Its berries come out in June and are totally edible. This bush attracts many birds, like the Baltimore oriole and even hummingbirds. They grow to be as big as a small tree.

Midwest native plant Truronia


Witch Hazel (Hamamelis)

Blooming in a beautiful yellow, the witch hazel shrub blossoms this season and brings a distinct perfumed smell to your backyard. It will be especially vibrant if planted in full sun, instead of partly shaded.

Midwest native plant Truronia

Sumac species (Rhus aromatica, Rhus typhina)

Speaking of beautiful reds, the smooth and staghorn sumac plants are vivid in color. Sumacs allow birds and other pollinators like bees to utilize its stems. This sumac plant comes in different variations, so make sure you research how to maintain them.

Midwest native plant Truronia


Redbud (Cercis canadensis)

This tree’s green leaves turn to yellow this season, but its spring flowers bring many pollinators that love the seeds. Unlike its name, the Redbud actually blooms pink flowers. You can watch bright red cardinals come visit this tree.

Midwest native plant Truronia


Aronia (A.melanocarpa, A. arbutifolia)

Last, but not least, and our favorite- the Aronia berry shrub. Also called chokeberry, this native Midwestern shrub provides sustenance for birds in the winter. The berries also help butterflies grow and bees love the flowers that blossom in the spring. This sturdy shrub is perfect for year-round gardening. And it makes for a great juice for us to drink!

Midwest native plant Truronia


Truronia is your new favorite superberry juice. With four tasty flavors, you’ll be reaping the benefits of Aronia berries: improved digestion, reduced inflammation, a more balanced cholesterol, strengthened immune system, and great for skin and eyes. Try one today!

Discover wellness with Truronia- fresh from Hastings, Nebraska.